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including senator lindsey graham and congressman peter king. are we inching closer to some potential compromise. athena joan has been following the fiscal cliff negotiations. >> martin, with congress returning this weekend, not much public evidence of any real progress on a deal the avoid the fiscal cliff. folks here in washington are wondering if this week will prove a turning point for republicans and democrats. members of congress expressed optimism sunday about the prospects for reaching a deal to avoid the fiscal cliff. a series of tax increases and spending cuts next year that could do serious damage to the economy. they also sounded warnings. >> we can and must get an agreement. otherwise i think first of all the markets are going to start reacting. >> it's not a done deal and not a certainty. if congress does nothing, which congress has gotten pretty good at doing these days, we'll go over the fiscal cliff. >> reporter: staffers have been working behind the scenes to find common ground to prevent across-the-board cuts lawmakers say should concern everyone. >> i think you shou
peter king on the controversy. >> i agree with chambliss. if i were in congress in 1941, i would have signed al declaration of war against japan. i'm not going to declare war against japan today. the times have changed. ronald reagan and tip o'neil recognized that in the '80s. everything should be on the table. >> joining me, ed and david. thank you for joining me. >> good to see you, alex. >> you heard representative king on "meet the press" saying that he agrees on the pledge to not raise taxes. >> if you look at exit polling, people want to see democrats and republicans working together. you talk to them over and over again and voters say that and expect it. you see lawmakers since they have returned saying that they want to work together and one of the ways is that whether it was on taxes or other issues. >> so david, the change of heart by the gop on taxes, is it legitimate? is it a philosophical change or facing political reality since the majority of the public are okay with tax hikes on the wealthy? >> it's a political reality and this is the result of an election. it is signi
to see you, grover. thank you for joining us. you heard lindsey graham a moment ago. peter king talked about saxby chambliss as well. here's what he said. >> i agree entirely with saxby chambliss. a pledge you signed 20 years ago, 18 years ago, is for that congress. for instance, if i were in congress in 1941 i would have signed -- supported a declaration of war against japan. i'm not going to attack japan today. the world has changed. >> senator john mccain weighed in as well. here's what he said. i'm sorry. let me read to you what he said. fewer and fewer people are signing this, quote, pledge. do you worry that this pledge is losing its grip on lawmakers? >> look, soledad, as you know, the people making this case, the three -- the two senators and the congressman that were put forward, they all said that two years ago when we were arguing over the debt ceiling limit. so their position hasn't changed. and during the debt ceiling limit we cut spending, we didn't raise taxes. so other republicans did not listen to peter king or these others and say, oh, let's go raise taxes. they're sp
norquist's no tax pledge. one of the latest is republican representative peter king. >> i agree entirely with saxby chambliss. a pledge you signed 20 years ago, 18 years ago is for that congress. if i were in congress in 1941 i would have supported a declaration of war against japan. i'm not going to attack japan today. the world has changed and the economic situation is different. >> republican senator saxby chambliss said, quote, country is more important than pledges. sorry, americans for tax reform and grover norquist, i'm in and out. it all sounds promising. you know, when it comes to compromise. except senators like lindsey graham didn't exactly say he was now open to raising taxes on the wealthiest americans. he actually said he supports capping deductions and buying down debt. which is different. so the question this morning, how excited should we really be by all of this talk of throwing grover norquist under the bust? under the bus, rather, not the bus. cnn contributor will cain is here along with jason johnson, chief political correspondent and political science professor at h
chambliss, peter king, coker, lindsey graham, who have been fiscal conservatives their entire lives. so it's very hard, i think, to make the argument. i think it's silly, also, to have this circular fire squad against good republicans who have been getting elected, and, you know, in order -- i think it's silly to take a circular fire squad and take him out during a primary, because of some piece of paper that got signed or not signed, lived up to or not lived up to. if, in fact, they are fiscal conservatives, which is the entire point of this discussion. we are losing the point of it. because we're getting so hung up on this, you know, piece of paper. i really find it somewhat silly, the entire thing. >> some people have suggested there is an interesting procedural solution to this idea, and that would be to actually let everything go off the cliff, even just for a day. what would happen then is the tax rates would automatically go up on everyone. again, even just a day. then on january 2nd or oh january 3rd or january 4th, everyone could come back together. they could vote for tax cuts fo
? lindsey graham, saxby chambliss, bob corker and peter king, and mike lee, they've all said they're willing to compromise and consider revenue increases to avoid the fiscal cliff. their shift in position has grover norquist vowing to help unseat any republican who breaks his taxpayer protection pledge. the question tonight is whether this is a larger trend or whether republicans are just testing the waters and two men who know about testing the waters, politicking and actually meaning what you say join me now. david frum and james carville, you have been on every side of this. let me start with you though david. republicans talking about raising revenue by closing loopholes. as opposes to raising tax rates. you can get a heck of a lot of revenue that way. is this smart for them r or not? >> republicans are going to be yielding ground, but they have to avoid seemingly yielding ground underressure. president has a strong hand. they have to keep their party together. frankly, i think loopholes are the wrong place to -- so-called loop homes, meaning deductions for home mortgage, are the wrong p
maybe we'll break that pledge. take a listen to peter king kongman from new york, a republican. >> i agree entirely with saxby chambliss. a pledge you signed 20 years ago, 18 years ago is for that congress. if i were in congress in 1941 i would have signed a support of declaration of war against japan. we're not going to attack japan today. the world has changed. >> king says that he's personally against raising taxes but he said, you know, when it comes to these negotiations everything needs to be on the table. john? >> all right, paul steinhauser down in washington this morning. great to see you. >> 32 minutes past the hour. no bah, humbug, just lots of buying over the weekend. a record $247 million shoppers hit the stores, and the websites right after thanksgiving. the national retail federation saying they also spent more money, this is compared to last year. but will shoppers still be in a spending mood today? because you know today is cyber monday. >> huh. that's why i got out of bed. >> christine romans is here. >> i can't go on about being something else. cyber monday the mad
cantor, saxby chambliss, peter king, lindsey graham and bob corker all saying to some degree or another that they would be willing to step back from it. certainly encouraging, but as you saw in that piece from a while ago from athena, there is still some distance between both sides as the clock winds down. >> and, dan, folks who came from those meetings with the president last week and they say that he in those meetings spoke very generally about the possibility of reforming these entitlement programs, big programs like medicare, medicaid, that type of thing, is the white house willing to put on the table specifics regarding the kinds of reforms in those big, big entitlement programs? >> if so, this is something that is happening behind closed dooshz, and they're not saying so publically. republicans have been looking at the health care reform law since the election time now, during the campaign to try to roll it back, to have it repealed. many attempts there. they were hoping that if they had won the election, that they could have also repealed it then, and now, of course, the presiden
the other saxby chambliss, lindsey graham, bob corker, peter king, they're willing to break the grover norquist pledge and consider new revenue. is this really anything new? >> no. all right. next question? first of all they're not saying anything new first of all. they're not saying we're willing to talk about rates -- >> bill: in fact they're saying they'll vote against rates -- getting rid of the bush tax cuts. >> this is not a change in policy at all. that's number one. number two these are -- senate republicans who don't have a lot of influence in this particular subject area. they're not the most -- they're not the biggest players. third, they're senate republicans. we need house republicans to change their minds. so i said this in my blog yesterday, this is not as significant as it seems and all of those who made such a big deal about it over the weekend are missing the key point. it is not a change in policy and two, look who it is. it is not that important. when i see some tea party switching and eric canto
of an update on the fiscal cliff and the progress that we saw. i have mentioned saxby chambliss and peter king, as well as lindsay gramm, putting distance between themselves and the pledge. with that kind of compromise coming from the republicans, where is the president willing to give? we have been asking over and over about the tax rates and whether he would, instead of increasing tax rates, perhaps settle for closing loopholes. could you tell us more about where the president stands on this? and what kind of confidence you can give the public that this will get done? >> let me start at the top by saying that some of the comments that you mentioned are welcome. they represent what we hope is a difference in tone and approach to these problems, and a recognition that a balanced approach to deficit reduction is the one that is most beneficial for our economy, protect the middle-class, strengthens its, creates levels of opportunity for those who aspire to the middle class to get there. i would also say that the president has made clear that he would not sign a bill that extends the bush era tax
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10